Episode 032 The Joy Is in the Process with Doug Ingram

In this week’s episode, I talked with an old acquaintance, Doug Ingram. Doug has led a fascinating life; I could probably spend hours talking and recording with him on his days as a coach, at the USOC and mountaineering.

During this episode we talk about some of his jobs at the USOC including being responsible for getting everyone and everything to the Olympic Games including how the equestrian folks get their horses to places like Sydney, Australia.

We focus on his mountaineering exploits including his trip to Antarctica and, of course, Everest. The inspiration for the interview came from the now famous photo of the long line of people waiting to summit Everest. Please check out the photo from when Doug reached the summit and the photo from 2019. There is a stark contrast!

Part of our discussion includes the process of acclimatizing on Everest; Doug shares his opinions on how the quest to climb Everest has changed. Hint: a lot might have to do with “Into Thin Air”.

Below are two photos from Hillary Step just below the summit. The top photo is from 2013 when Doug ascended. The bottom photo is from 2019.

Hillary Step 2013
Hillary Step 2019

Episode 031 LTAD in Practice with Jeff Richardson

Jeff Richardson is a middle school teacher and baseball coach in tiny Houston, Missouri who has been able to implement the concepts of long-term athlete development in his community’s parks and rec department. He is also working to integrate LTAD into the schools.

We discuss his background as a baseball coach and how his views on developing pitchers has evolved from looking at “mechanics” to “movement”.

Jeff shares his discovery of LTAD and how it resonated with him.

We discuss how he went about getting stakeholders in the community to buy into the LTAD concept.

The interview serves as a primer for those who want to move past talking about LTAD and start “doing” LTAD.

We also discuss small town life and go off on a few tangents.

Jeff’s efforts were profiled in his local newspaper.

You can follow Jeff on Twitter @J_Richardson12.

Episode 030 IOC Consensus Statement on Mental Health with Claudia Reardon, MD

This episode with Claudia Reardon, MD is being hosted both on the USCCE podcast feed and the Smartercoaching feed because I think it is a really important topic. During the podcast we cover the following topics and then some. Mental health is pretty broad and future episodes will address many of the topics not addressed in this episode.

What was the catalyst for forming this committee to create the consensus statement?

Who were the people on the committee in terms of backgrounds and expertise?

How does cultural/ethnicity impact the diagnosis or for coaches in recognizing symptoms?

What are the mental health issues the paper addresses? What are the issues that may have greater prevalence in the athlete population than in the general population?

What about the distribution of issues amongst sports types (combat, aesthetic, CGS, team, etc.)?

What should coaches, trainers, et al., be on the look out for?

What recommendations do you make for sport organizations from clubs, teams and NGBs, NOCs?

How do we distinguish between overtraining/overreaching and depression since the symptoms can be similar?

Let's focus on depression and suicide, what are the symptoms of depression?

What makes depression different from just having a rough day or two or perhaps dealing with a life event (retirement, major competition loss or loss of a loved one)? What are signs of suicide?

If I am in a person's life (athlete or not), what can I do if I suspect the person is considering suicide.

This episode with Claudia Reardon, MD is being hosted both on the USCCE podcast feed and the Smartercoaching feed because I think it is a really important topic. During the podcast we cover the following topics and then some. Mental health is pretty broad and future episodes will address many of the topics not addressed in this episode.

What was the catalyst for forming this committee to create the consensus statement?

Who were the people on the committee in terms of backgrounds and expertise?

How does cultural/ethnicity impact the diagnosis or for coaches in recognizing symptoms?

What are the mental health issues the paper addresses? What are the issues that may have greater prevalence in the athlete population than in the general population?

What about the distribution of issues amongst sports types (combat, aesthetic, CGS, team, etc.)?

What should coaches, trainers, et al., be on the look out for?

What recommendations do you make for sport organizations from clubs, teams and NGBs, NOCs?

How do we distinguish between overtraining/overreaching and depression since the symptoms can be similar?

Let's focus on depression and suicide, what are the symptoms of depression?

What makes depression different from just having a rough day or two or perhaps dealing with a life event (retirement, major competition loss or loss of a loved one)? What are signs of suicide?

If I am in a person's life (athlete or not), what can I do if I suspect the person is considering suicide.

Links

IOC Consensus Statement

NCAA Resources

About Dr. Reardon

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Episode 029 Catching ZZZZZs with Sleep4Sport Amy Bender

Amy Bender, PhD, joins me to discuss a topic that is near and dear to my heart: sleep.

 This is near and dear to me because I have struggled with sleep for as long as I can remember. To some extent, I think this is because my chronotype is that of the “owl”—I tend to be more of a night owl. However, the work world does not seem to appreciate we night owls!!!!!

 Thanks to Amy for being such an engaging guest!

 Her background as an athlete and scientist.

How she got interested sleep?

Why do we sleep?

What is happening in the brain while we are sleeping?

What is the thing that would surprise people about sleep?

What happens if we go a long period without sleep?

What are the consequences of not getting enough sleep? (Acute as well as chronic sleep deficiency)

What role does sleep play in learning new skills or integrating new information? (I have read claims that learning a new skill and then sleeping helps embed that new skill).

What is insomnia and the "forms" of it?

What can we do to improve our quality of sleep?

What to do if a person cannot fall asleep?

What to do if a person wakes up in the middle of the night and cannot fall back to sleep?

 We discuss "biphasic sleep"?

 Amy mentioned the Sleep Junkies podcast: https://sleepjunkies.com/podcast/

Twitter: @sleep4sport

Instagram: sleep4sport

Episode 027 Physical literacy with Glenn Young

Glenn Young is a former Vancouver, BC PE teacher and district coordinator who is an advocate for physical literacy although he is not a huge fan of the term “physical literacy” (PL).

We discuss Glenn’s background and he became an evangelist including his being involved in the early discussions in Canada. We get into the history of the term “physical literacy” starting around 2000 with the obesity and inactivity crises in Canada.

Glenn shares his definition and explains why getting hung up on a definition can be detrimental to implementing PL.

Glenn reminds us that the kids in the PE class are the clients and a stakeholder.

We discuss how physical activity, education and literacy differ and how he worked with non-PE teachers in schools to get kids physically active. He shares his thoughts on Teaching Games for Understanding.

You can follow Glenn on Twitter @ glennyoung_PE and is email is glenn.young@gmail.com.

Here is an article I reference in the show from LinkedIn. https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/developing-physical-literacy-glenn-young/

Episode 026 Nutrition with Stephanie Miezin

Stephanie Miezin is a registered dietitian working for the United States Olympic Committee (USOC). Her job there is to make sure the dining hall at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, CO is meeting the nutrition needs of the athletes who live and/or train there.

We discuss the following:

  • Her path from culinary school to registered dietitian

  • The difference between being a RD and a nutritionist

  • What one can expect in working with a RD

  • The “Big Items” to take care of in your own nutrition

  • Nutrient timing

  • Protein!

  • Keto (could not help but talk about that, right?)

  • Evaluating claims made by diet promoters or supplement companies

Stephanie has a great “food first” philosophy and encourages folks to learn how to cook so it gives you more control over your nutrition, and it is just fun! (Note: I like to cook, but I am not sure I have as much fun as Stephanie does in cooking)!

Stephanie can be found on Instagram at Cookeatcompete and she has a website, cookeatcompete.com.

Links of note

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (to help you find a RD)

Cooking videos from the USOC

Recipes from TeamUSA!

Episode 025 Endure with Alex Hutchinson

Alex Hutchinson, the author of Endure and Which Comes First, Cardio or Weights?, joins me on the podcast today. Alex also blogs at Sweatscience hosted by Outside online.

Alex and I discuss:

How he got started in writing about endurance sports and sport science

The premise of Endure

The role the brain and mind play in endurance performance including a discussion of Noakes’ Central Governor Theory and criticisms of it—particularly from Samuele Marcora.

Twitter: the good and the bad in terms of sport science discussions and how they can devolve into personal attacks

Some of the brain fatigue training Alex underwent during his marathon training

His first book, Which Comes First, and what he has learned since

You can follow Alex on Twitter (and I recommend it) @sweatscience.

Links of note

Endure

Which Comes First, Cardio or Weights?

Sweatscience Blog

Jockology (Toronto Globe and Mail, subscription required)

Episode 024 Good to Go with Christie Aschwanden

I say this all too often…this was such a fun interview with Christie Ashwanden, the author Good to Go: What the Athlete in all of us can learn from the strange science of recovery.

We discuss her background as an athlete from wannabe volleyball player to runner to cyclist to cross country skier along with her academic background.

Our discussion of recovery includes:

·       float tanks (the old sensory deprivation tanks—and a discussion of the movie, Altered States),

·       ice baths

·       massage

·       the placebo or expectation effect

·       beer (okay this is a tease, but we do mention it)

Finally, we end with Christie’s recommendation on the top recovery modality! Hint: it is free (although I guess you can pay a lot if you want to).

You can follow Christie on Twitter at @cragcrest and her website is https://christieaschwanden.com/.

She is a contributor at https://fivethirtyeight.com/contributors/christie-aschwanden/ writing about hydration, replication crisis and the sport science methodology issues.

 Click to listen on Apple Podcast.

 

 

Episode 023 The Evolution of Power-Based Cycling Coaching with Hunter Allen

Hunter Allen, the CEO of Peaks Coaching Group and the author of Training and Racing with Powermeter 3rd edition, joins me to discuss his coaching and the early days of using power as a cycling coach.

Hunter shares how he got started in cycling as a BMX racer, then mountain biker and finally as a road racer in Spain. We discuss his transition into coaching.

We talk about the 2002 power based seminar in Philadelphia, PA and how he and Kevin Williams came up with the first software that could truly analyze power files from different devices.

We discuss how using power changed his approach to coaching, but that he also made sure that he remembered that a person is on the other side of that file and how one has to take into account life and its demands when coaching and training.

Links

Peaks Coaching Group

Training and Racing with a Powermeter (co-authored with Andy Coggan and Steve McGregor)

Episode 022 Training and Racing with a Powermeter with Andy Coggan, PhD

I connect with my old friend Andy Coggan, PhD to discuss using powermeters to train cyclists.

We start out with a discussion of the history of measuring intensity using heart rate, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), oxygen consumption and move into power.

We discuss Andy’s early days as a bike racer and how he discovered exercise science. That combination led him to using powermeters early on and being at the forefront of looking at how to measure training using a powermeter.

We discuss the early discussions on the Usenet (look it up) forum rec.bicycles.racing where I first learned about Andy when I was a graduate student. Reading his posts there and later on the Topica Wattage forum led me to invite him to speak at the first USA Cycling Power Based Training seminar in Philadelphia, PA in June 2002 (we could not remember if it was 2001 or 2002 during the interview).

Andy was later instrumental in designing the USA Cycling Power Based Training Clinic as well as developing the first sport physiology curriculum for the USA Cycling Level 2 clinics.

We discuss some of the limitations of using power and the benefits as well.

For information on ordering Training and Racing with a Powermeter, 3rd edition and for a little history of power-based training visit Training and Racing with a Powermeter.

Quick Note

I just started a new job as the Senior Manager for Coaching Education at USA Fencing.  Because of that I am taking a little hiatus from the podcast although I plan to record two more soon since they have been in the works.

Also, sorry about the error in the description of the podcast with Jean Cote that showed up in iTunes and the download.  Poor quality control on my part!

Episode 021 Transformational Coaching with Dr. Jean Cote

On today's podcast, I talk with Dr. Jean Cote from Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada.  We discuss how smaller cities are producing more professionals than large cities.  He offers his thoughts on why that might be occurring.

We also discuss early specialization and sampling of sports.  Dr. Cote focuses on kids being able to make the decisions for themselves.  But then how does a kid decide to specialize if the kid has not experience alternatives?

Dr. Cote shares his model of sport participation and transformational coaching.

Dr. Cote website at Queens University includes access to a lot of his papers. 

Dr. Cote has also worked with the NBA and USA Basketball on youth sports guidelines.

Here is a link to more reading on Cote's Development Model for Sports Participation

Dr. Cote email is jc46@queensu.ca

His twitter handle is @jeancote46.

 

Episode 019 Delving into the Mind with Dr. Kirsten Peterson

First, I want to remind folks that you can support the podcast through a GoFundMe account.  Any donation helps!

Next I want to thank Lee Rosevere for creating the music I use in the podcast.  Lee offers the music for free as long as I give him attribution.  So thanks Lee!

Dr. Kirsten Peterson is a sport psychologist with the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS).  She and I worked in the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) Sport Science division at one time.  (For the sake of both of us, I will not say how many years ago it was.)  The AIS is one of the leading organizations in the world at combining athlete training and sport science.  It does a bang up job of research in sport science and applying it to athletes.

During the interview, Kirsten and I discuss how she got into sport psychology (it is a very personal reason).  We also discuss the following:

What sport psychology is.

We talk about the differences in the sport development systems in the US and Australia.

 

 

Episode 018 Very Superstitious with Dr. Kristi Erdal

Hey, if you have not already done so, please subscribe at iTunes and leave a rating and review.  In addition if you like the podcast and want to support it, please make a donation at my GoFundMe page.

Apologies to Stevie Wonder for the title...

Also, at times I sound like I am in a well.  I apologize for that. I promise at no time was I held against my will, and at no time did I need to capture a dog in an attempt to get out of the well.

I came across Dr. Erdal on the You Are Not So Smart podcast where she discussed her research on sleep and a placebo effect with one of her then students (the podcast was recorded about two years ago).  At the end of the podcast she mentioned that she was in the process of writing a book on youth sports.  Naturally that piqued my interest so I went searching the internet only to find that she is a professor of psychology at Colorado College in Colorado Springs where I live.

Her bio says that she has also done research on sports superstitions and concussions.  We decided to discuss superstitions and youth sports on this podcast.  Perhaps on down the road we can get into concussions.

On the podcast, we discuss how superstitions form and how early work from Dr. B.F. Skinner with pigeons gave great insight into the illusory connections animals and (sadly) humans make between actions.  So, in essence, we and the athletes we coach might not be much smarter than a pigeon.  We discuss some research that she and another student did on superstitions and how it gave them insight into learned helplessness.  We finish up discussing aspects of youth sports that went into her book.

Links

Bio

Link to You Are Not So Smart podcast on the Placebo Effect

Episode 017 Reading Scientific Papers with Kym Fasczewski, PhD

In this episode I bring back Dr. Kym Fasczewski from Appalachian State University to help explain what you will find in a scientific journal article.  What do terms like "double-blind" mean and whay makes it important?  What is a p-value?  Basically we want to give you a primer on reading peer-reviewed researched.  While we talk about statistics, we are not going to make you calculate any.  We also talk about how to spot fake scientific journals; these are journals where there is little to no review.  In fact we discuss how someone pulled the wool over the media's eyes using such a journal.

Here are some links that either we referenced or I thought might be helpful.

Research Gate is a website that allows scientists to post scientific papers.  Access is free.

PubMed is a site run by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) that allows you to search for journal articles based on search terms.  However, you are likely only going to get access to abstracts of papers on this site.

Scholar.google.com is similar to PubMed in that you can search for papers, but it does a poorer job of separating out legitimate sources from less legitimate sources.  However, if you find a paper in PubMed and entire the entire title of the paper in Scholar.Google.Com you might be able to find the entire paper for free.

Statistical Thinking has an in-depth article on issues with p values.  

MethodsMan has some good articles as well.  This specific one is about the issue of replication in the medical field.

How to read a scientific paper by Adam Ruben of ScienceMag.org

My take on how to read a scientific paper published in Performance Conditioning.

Last, here is a link to Dr. Fasczewski's bio at the Appalachian State University website (Go Mountaineers!, your host earned a master's degree from Appalachian State).

Episode 016 Building Character with Larry Lauer of US Tennis

Hey, thanks for finding the podcast.  I would appreciate any help you can throw my way.  You can contribute to the podcast through my GoFundMe account.  If you donate, I will give you a shout out on social media and in the next podcast that I record.  

Dr. Larry Lauer joins today's podcast to discuss the role he plays as a sport psychologist with the US Tennis Association (USTA).  Dr. Lauer worked with Michigan high school sports coaches on coaching development and best practices before moving to USTA.

USTA's goal is to develop American tennis players into the best in the world, but it is approaching it in new ways that focus on character development including seven core values.  Dr. Lauer also works with coaches on mental skills training.

Larry is on twitter although he admits he is not very active.  @LarryLauer

If you want to know more about Larry, his bio is on the US Tennis website.

He is also the author USTA Mental Skills and Drills.

Episode 014 The Theory of Everything with Dr. Stephen Seiler

(NOTE: Sorry about the the posts being out of order, but for some reason iTunes did not pick this up when it was originally posted. I have posted it here hoping that iTunes sees it this time.)

Hey, thanks for finding the podcast.  I would really appreciate you showing me the podcast some love by supporting the podcast in two ways.  First, go to iTunes and subscribe and rate the podcast.  Second, how about a donation to my GoFundMe page to help support the podcast?

This episode features Stephen Seiler, PhD a well-known sports scientist.  Dr. Seiler is an American who lives in Norway where he has worked with various Olympic teams and studied sports performance.

Dr. Seiler might be best known for his ideas about polarized training; an idea that bucks the conventional wisdom of endurance training.  He did not just pull this out of thin air; he was working with high level athletes and coaches and looking at their training.  He looked at the training of rowers, cross country skiers, and runners and found that they were training at the ends of the continuum of intensity.  A lot (80% or so) of the training was well below the lactate threshold (think the intensity one can sustain for an hour) while a smaller portion (~20%) was spent at a very high percentage of VO2max.  The athletes and coaches were avoiding the "black hole" that is that intensity around lactate threshold.  Dr. Seiler expounds on this area.

That reference to a "black hole" led me to suggest a General Relativity of training, but I went with "Theory of Everything" because I liked the movie of that title about Stephen Hawking.

We also discuss his Hierarchy of Endurance Training inspired by Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs.  The pyramid starts with a foundation of training concepts that were well-researched and widely accepted and then moves up the pyramid to things that become more important once we have the lower layers taken care of.  I think that people are looking for shortcuts or to do exotic things whereas the biggest bang for the buck comes from more mundane well-established methods.  This is the Hype Curve Dr. Seiler mentions in the podcast.

Here are some links that relate to the podcast.

Who is Dr. Seiler? Bio

Publications and Research

Hierarchy of Endurance Training Needs

Twitter:  @StephenSeiler